The much-needed makeover of clunky enterprise HR tech

In the ‘attention economy’, user experience is the most valuable currency. Here’s how enterprises can capitalize on this trend and stay relevant.

Chaitanya Peddi Jul 01st 2019 A-A+
Chaitanya_Peddi__Co-founder,_Darwinbox.jpg

The consumerization of services across all walks of life is undoubtedly here. This can be seen in varied industries such as food delivery, cab services, e-commerce, and even personal dating lives. 

New age platforms such as Netflix, Uber, Amazon and more have changed how users perceive an online platform and what their expectations are. They want their user experience to be personalized, immediate and contextual - and the loss of a satisfactory experience often leads to them opting for a competing service within seconds.

Now, cut to the enterprise world, and employers are beginning to understand that clunky digital apps and legacy systems are reason enough for employees to disengage.
 
This triggers as user expectations are transferred from the daily-life apps to the apps they use at work. As they begin to expect the same fluid UI and UX that they are used to seeing, it leaves many traditional enterprise products with a huge gap to fill. They have to contend with being agile, flexible and providing memorable user experiences, all while carrying the burden of legacy systems and dealing with the challenge of digitizing workflows that are far more intricate than what the consumer apps fulfill.
 

In order to make enterprise applications truly intuitive and memorable, an efficient study into user behaviour is a must. Without such a protocol in place, every step towards digital transformation and user experience enhancement that an enterprise takes will simply be an unrelated shot in the dark.

A net result of poor UI/UX is lower adoption rates, which ultimately transform into reduced ROI on enterprise tech investments. The problem becomes a lot more daunting when an organizations’ HR system (the only system in an enterprise that interface with every single employee in the organization) suffers from this ailment.
 
Building intuitive user experience for employees
 
Most modern enterprises are aware of this situation they find themselves in. The solution is often simple, but implementing it takes a degree of change and overhaul that they are not committed to.

This leads to half-baked approaches where small compartments are digitized without assessing the overall impact on user experience. Users, or employees, hence, end up working with vastly different platforms and applications that range from ultra-modern to ultra-clunky.
 
In order to make enterprise applications truly intuitive and memorable, an efficient study into user behaviour is a must. Without such a protocol in place, every step towards digital transformation and user experience enhancement that an enterprise takes will simply be an unrelated shot in the dark. And it will eventually lead users to get more and more confused. 

Enterprises should also remember that this is an iterative process that is constantly evolving. There is no single answer to providing their users with a memorable user experience. It’s about a collection of small changes that all add up to influence the most important user actions at critical moments.
 
Some tips to keep in mind to achieve this are:
 
1. Choose a solution with clean and clutter-free design and choose a unified experience.
2. Ensure accessibility and superior experience on mobile apps (60 percent of users engage through mobile devices but rate the experience poorly).
3. Adopt zero interface (screenless) technologies like voice-first bots and facial recognition/gestures. Natural and conversational interfaces like these lower the barriers of adoption exponentially.
4. While choosing a solution focus on not just the look and feel, but on how easy it is to use without training or a demo.
5. Let engagement be driven by context. Check if your systems nudge and prompt the employees to complete an action or initiate a dialogue by triangulating data points from across the employee’s journey.
 
All of these factors seem obvious to most enterprises, and indeed many of them opt for individual service providers to obtain each of these facets, but the implementation can be vastly more superior when a common theme and vision runs through them all.
 
If every activity that an enterprise undertakes is done with the sole purpose of improving user experience and engagement, then the results will be more effective and insightful. Providing unifying experiences across all personal and professional applications requires a degree of data transparency and exchange that most enterprises are still not adequately armed for.

They have all the information needed to understand customer/employee behavior but still lack the tools and vision to find the most relevant data and act upon it.
 
In the ‘attention economy’, user experience is the most valuable currency, and the only way for enterprises to capitalize on this trend and stay relevant is to make every single workforce interaction with technology engaging, memorable and naturally intuitive.

Chaitanya Peddi is Co-founder, Darwinbox

Disclaimer: This article is published as part of the IDG Contributor Network. The views expressed in this article are solely those of the contributing authors and not of IDG Media and its editor(s).

The much-needed makeover of clunky enterprise HR tech

In the ‘attention economy’, user experience is the most valuable currency. Here’s how enterprises can capitalize on this trend and stay relevant.

Chaitanya Peddi
Chaitanya_Peddi__Co-founder,_Darwinbox.jpg

The consumerization of services across all walks of life is undoubtedly here. This can be seen in varied industries such as food delivery, cab services, e-commerce, and even personal dating lives. 

New age platforms such as Netflix, Uber, Amazon and more have changed how users perceive an online platform and what their expectations are. They want their user experience to be personalized, immediate and contextual - and the loss of a satisfactory experience often leads to them opting for a competing service within seconds.

Now, cut to the enterprise world, and employers are beginning to understand that clunky digital apps and legacy systems are reason enough for employees to disengage.
 
This triggers as user expectations are transferred from the daily-life apps to the apps they use at work. As they begin to expect the same fluid UI and UX that they are used to seeing, it leaves many traditional enterprise products with a huge gap to fill. They have to contend with being agile, flexible and providing memorable user experiences, all while carrying the burden of legacy systems and dealing with the challenge of digitizing workflows that are far more intricate than what the consumer apps fulfill.
 

In order to make enterprise applications truly intuitive and memorable, an efficient study into user behaviour is a must. Without such a protocol in place, every step towards digital transformation and user experience enhancement that an enterprise takes will simply be an unrelated shot in the dark.

A net result of poor UI/UX is lower adoption rates, which ultimately transform into reduced ROI on enterprise tech investments. The problem becomes a lot more daunting when an organizations’ HR system (the only system in an enterprise that interface with every single employee in the organization) suffers from this ailment.
 
Building intuitive user experience for employees
 
Most modern enterprises are aware of this situation they find themselves in. The solution is often simple, but implementing it takes a degree of change and overhaul that they are not committed to.

This leads to half-baked approaches where small compartments are digitized without assessing the overall impact on user experience. Users, or employees, hence, end up working with vastly different platforms and applications that range from ultra-modern to ultra-clunky.
 
In order to make enterprise applications truly intuitive and memorable, an efficient study into user behaviour is a must. Without such a protocol in place, every step towards digital transformation and user experience enhancement that an enterprise takes will simply be an unrelated shot in the dark. And it will eventually lead users to get more and more confused. 

Enterprises should also remember that this is an iterative process that is constantly evolving. There is no single answer to providing their users with a memorable user experience. It’s about a collection of small changes that all add up to influence the most important user actions at critical moments.
 
Some tips to keep in mind to achieve this are:
 
1. Choose a solution with clean and clutter-free design and choose a unified experience.
2. Ensure accessibility and superior experience on mobile apps (60 percent of users engage through mobile devices but rate the experience poorly).
3. Adopt zero interface (screenless) technologies like voice-first bots and facial recognition/gestures. Natural and conversational interfaces like these lower the barriers of adoption exponentially.
4. While choosing a solution focus on not just the look and feel, but on how easy it is to use without training or a demo.
5. Let engagement be driven by context. Check if your systems nudge and prompt the employees to complete an action or initiate a dialogue by triangulating data points from across the employee’s journey.
 
All of these factors seem obvious to most enterprises, and indeed many of them opt for individual service providers to obtain each of these facets, but the implementation can be vastly more superior when a common theme and vision runs through them all.
 
If every activity that an enterprise undertakes is done with the sole purpose of improving user experience and engagement, then the results will be more effective and insightful. Providing unifying experiences across all personal and professional applications requires a degree of data transparency and exchange that most enterprises are still not adequately armed for.

They have all the information needed to understand customer/employee behavior but still lack the tools and vision to find the most relevant data and act upon it.
 
In the ‘attention economy’, user experience is the most valuable currency, and the only way for enterprises to capitalize on this trend and stay relevant is to make every single workforce interaction with technology engaging, memorable and naturally intuitive.

Chaitanya Peddi is Co-founder, Darwinbox

Disclaimer: This article is published as part of the IDG Contributor Network. The views expressed in this article are solely those of the contributing authors and not of IDG Media and its editor(s).