From the Governing Board: Small is Beautiful

 

Small, but significant, projects help CIOs align IT with business—in a downturn—and also establishes them as business leaders.

 

Sunil Mehta Oct 25th 2012 A-A+
Sunil Mehta is CIO, Sr. VP & Area Systems Director (Central Asia), JWT

It’s in these troubled times that such small, but significant projects, add immense value to organizations.

 

Recently, we tried our hands at a campaign and performance management system that keeps track of end-to-end activities of a campaign. This includes all the essential steps from the beginning of a campaign—client brief, subsequent discussions, and alterations on every actionable item or activity—to sending it to various publications and channels. This project helped us save innumerable and precious man-hours and also allowed us to build in more efficiency and visibility within the organization.

It’s in these troubled times—when IT budgets are restricted and organizations are cautious—that such small, but significant projects, add immense value to organizations. But many organizations want to be ambitious. After all, it’s human nature to aspire for something miraculous in times of crisis. However, CIOs should remember that attempting a project that promises huge benefits but is not aligned to business metrics could be a substantial risk. 

In a down economy, businesses want to keep it simple. They want to stick to the basics. And CIOs should appreciate that. CIOs should focus more on what business wants: Efficient processes, quicker workflows, and reduced operational costs. Also, the reality today is that there isn’t enough cashflow to support large projects. That’s something small projects don't really need, because they don’t require a drastic overhaul of an organization’s IT infrastructure. Hence, low hanging fruits—like JWT’s campaign management system—keeps our innovative streak intact and also showcases a CIO’s understanding of business realities and how well IT is aligned with organizational needs. 

CIOs must also remember that, at the end of the day, every organization works toward customer satisfaction. So, whether a project brings tangible benefits that have a direct impact on balance sheets or intangible benefits like increased efficiency or accuracy, it’s worth the effort. That’s because any project that has a direct impact on a customer’s experience of doing business with the company will definitely get noticed—no matter how minimal the benefits are. In fact, they can also help organizations adapt to market dynamics faster. And this is the need of the hour.

 

From the Governing Board: Small is Beautiful

 

Small, but significant, projects help CIOs align IT with business—in a downturn—and also establishes them as business leaders.

 

Sunil Mehta
Sunil Mehta is CIO, Sr. VP & Area Systems Director (Central Asia), JWT

It’s in these troubled times that such small, but significant projects, add immense value to organizations.

 

Recently, we tried our hands at a campaign and performance management system that keeps track of end-to-end activities of a campaign. This includes all the essential steps from the beginning of a campaign—client brief, subsequent discussions, and alterations on every actionable item or activity—to sending it to various publications and channels. This project helped us save innumerable and precious man-hours and also allowed us to build in more efficiency and visibility within the organization.

It’s in these troubled times—when IT budgets are restricted and organizations are cautious—that such small, but significant projects, add immense value to organizations. But many organizations want to be ambitious. After all, it’s human nature to aspire for something miraculous in times of crisis. However, CIOs should remember that attempting a project that promises huge benefits but is not aligned to business metrics could be a substantial risk. 

In a down economy, businesses want to keep it simple. They want to stick to the basics. And CIOs should appreciate that. CIOs should focus more on what business wants: Efficient processes, quicker workflows, and reduced operational costs. Also, the reality today is that there isn’t enough cashflow to support large projects. That’s something small projects don't really need, because they don’t require a drastic overhaul of an organization’s IT infrastructure. Hence, low hanging fruits—like JWT’s campaign management system—keeps our innovative streak intact and also showcases a CIO’s understanding of business realities and how well IT is aligned with organizational needs. 

CIOs must also remember that, at the end of the day, every organization works toward customer satisfaction. So, whether a project brings tangible benefits that have a direct impact on balance sheets or intangible benefits like increased efficiency or accuracy, it’s worth the effort. That’s because any project that has a direct impact on a customer’s experience of doing business with the company will definitely get noticed—no matter how minimal the benefits are. In fact, they can also help organizations adapt to market dynamics faster. And this is the need of the hour.